Paradise Dinner Rolls {King’s Hawaiian Dinner Rolls++!}

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}

So many recipes, so little time. Gosh, if my life was judged by how many posts I make on my blog, it would get a D-. However, my life is full and my time is often spent in unexpected yet familiar arenas. I say unexpected because I start each day with a plan which generally unravels then re-ravels itself in ways I did not plan. Often the re-raveling involves spending unexpected time with my family. No complaints about time spent becoming a part of the day’s tapestry involving family.

In the wee hours of the morning I often wax philosophical. It’s after 2:00 AM as I am writing this post and I am thinking about the past month with all of its wonders. Ander’s unexpected early birth, Tricia’s health problems, Matt going to Florida to work, Katie deciding to move back to the “big city”, getting to spend so many days caring for my grandsons…lot’s of things…even my daughter’s old high school track team buddies and their husbands/wives and children having a last minute party in my back yard because a grill situation had not worked out and they needed to use our grill. It was an interesting experience, seeing all of those young adults who used to hang out in my back yard when they were teenagers, now hanging out in my back yard with families of their own. Children, babies, and more babies on the way: Life’s tapestry.

Just as it used to be in bygone days, the track team happened to show up just as something was coming out of the oven. One of the things that brings me the most enjoyment in the kitchen and always says “home” to me is making bread or rolls. Bread is family. Bread has its own rhythm–rising, falling, rising again. The dough is kneaded and shaped, a series of raveling and unraveling and re-raveling so that the final product is so much more than its beginning. It’s sort of like the track team having been together as teenagers, then each individual going their own way over the past ten years, and once again reuniting, having increased their lives with the inclusion of spouses and children and jobs and further education.

How did they “know” that there would be hot rolls just coming out of the oven? It was uncanny.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}

The rolls that I had made were inspired by recipes I had seen from various sources for King’s Hawaiian rolls. After some experimenting with on-line recipes, I decided to modify my “Sunday Best” Rolls recipe. It is a delicious, can-always-count-on-it kind of recipe and I felt comfortable changing various elements of it to accommodate some of the ingredients I saw in other recipes.

One of the key changes that I made was to use coconut oil in place of the butter. As I experimented with using coconut oil, I noticed that the dough felt “silky”, or maybe “satiny” would be a better word. I can’t think of any other way to describe it. It was soft and smooth and handled beautifully.

Another change that I made in the recipe included using honey instead of sugar which brought extra moistness to the dough. Of course there was the requisite pineapple juice and I also added some ginger.

The rolls turned out light and tender with a hint of coconut. Their sweetness provides a great flavor contrast to savory main dishes such as barbecue and  kalua pork, as a side for Thai Peanut Noodle Salad, or even piled high with chicken salad. Happy baking!

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Proof the yeast in the warm water with a pinch of sugar. I nearly always do this, even if I am using an instant yeast. There have been too many times when I have had yeast that did not activate in dough. So, I want to make sure that I get the yeast going before I add it to all of the other ingredients.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Add the pineapple juice. I used a brand of pineapple juice that comes in a jar. I like the flavor better than pineapple from a can…no metallic “can” taste in it.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}This is the coconut oil. It is typically a soft solid at temperatures below 76 degrees F. I slightly liquified it in the microwave for about 15 seconds on high. There are a mixture of solids and liquids at this point. Perfect.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Add the honey. I used honey from a local farm. This is really good stuff. Utah bees definitely know their business.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Now for the chicken ovum. Two of them. Yay for chickens!

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}The yeast did it’s thing, rose and got all foamy. You can see the foam lingering behind the liquid.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Make sure you get the foam added to the bowl as well. No yeast left behind.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Add the salt. I used sea salt…paradise…sea salt…the sea…a quiet Caribbean beach…sigh.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Add four cups of flour…or was it three? Whatever I said in the directions…add that much flour.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Now plop in the ginger. It’s good.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}With the paddle attachment(s) for your style of mixer, get things all mixed up. Knead for about 5 minutes. Look how this dough is coming together already. I’m telling you, this is truly the best bread or roll dough with which I have ever worked. It must be the coconut oil!

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Switch to the dough hook. Time for some more flour. Add about 1 cup.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Turn on the mixer and start kneading the dough.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}With the mixer running, continue adding flour, sprinkling it in 1/2 cup at a time, just until the dough comes together and leaves the side of the bowl. Once this happens, STOP adding flour!

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}See how the dough is not sticking to the sides of the bowl? It’s okay to have small a bit of dough that doesn’t join the party. There are always wall clingers at every party. You can scoop them off the sides at the end of the kneading. Knead the dough in the bowl for 7 minutes until….

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}You get a masterpiece that looks like dough satin—-or silk—-or satiny silky perfection. I LOVE this dough! It is amazing to handle it. This picture is with the machine turned off, by the way. See how the dough sheets? And look at those bubbles just beneath the dough surface!

Paradise Dinner Rolls 211Gather the dough into a ball. Place it in an oiled or greased bowl and turn the dough over once.  The dough will have collected some of the oil off of the bowl and will have a lightly oiled surface. This helps to keep the dough from drying out while it rises.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and put it in a warm place to rise. I like to turn on my oven for a minute or two, just until the temperature is about 100 degrees F, then turn it back off and leave the oven light turned on. I then put the bowl of dough in the warm oven to rise. Leaving the oven light on helps to keep the oven warm. Allow the dough to rise until it is double in bulk.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}This rose a good deal more than double. Try not to let this happen because the yeast can become exhausted (all used up) and not rise well when formed into rolls. However, the brand of yeast that I use (SAF instant yeast) is an excellent yeast and had plenty of umpf left to raise the rolls. Whew!

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}This is another shot of the dough after I removed the plastic wrap. Generally speaking, when I remove the plastic wrap off of other doughs they will start to collapse. Not this dough. It hung out all happy and glorious.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Punch the dough down. Usually a good punch will instantly deflate the dough; not with this dough. I punched it and it just sat there with my fist in the middle of it and its sides still all puffy and proud, sort of like it was laughing at me like a jolly Buddha.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}I kept working the dough, punching and squeezing until I finally got it somewhat deflated. I finally resorted to gathering it into a ball (sort of) and tossing it against the counter a few times and then kneading it. I felt guilty at having to work this joyful dough so hard. Honestly, I have never worked with such a resilient dough. What a good self image this stuff had. Gather the dough back into a ball, cover it, and allow it to rest for 5-10 minutes. You might need to take a rest, too.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Once both you and the dough have rested for a few minutes, melt some butter (1 stick) and place in a bowl near your work area.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Working with half of the dough at a time, divide each half into 20 equal-sized pieces. I have just enough OCD left over from my early youth to have used my kitchen scale for weighing each roll so that I was sure to get them equally sized. If you are a free spirit who doesn’t need to weigh and measure, congratulations. Live long and prosper. Form each piece of dough into a ball, dip in the melted butter, and place in the prepared pan. For some tutorial pics on forming this type of roll, see My “Sunday Best” Rolls tutorial.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Aaaaaaand another shot of these exciting rolls before rising and baking.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Cover the rolls loosely with plastic wrap. Return them to a warm place to rise until almost double in bulk. If you choose to put them in a softly warmed oven, be sure to remove them from the oven and remove the plastic wrap prior to baking.

Paradise Dinner Rolls {better than King's Hawaiian!!}Preheat the oven to 350-degree F. Put the rolls in the oven (remember to remove the plastic wrap!!!!) and immediately turn the oven down to 325-degrees F. Bake for about 30 minutes or until golden brown. Take them out of the oven, snap a couple of quick shots of them, and move out of the way or else the track team will run over you trying to get to the rolls. Sure wish I had a smell-a-blog app so that you could be going crazy right now.

For an in-depth tutorial on homemade bread, see my 100% Whole Wheat Bread recipe.

Paradise Dinner Rolls

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 4 hours

Yield: 40 rolls

Tender, fluffy and lightly sweet with hints of pineapple, honey and ginger, these rolls make any meal special.

Recipe by Terri @ that's some good cookin'

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons yeast or 3 packages of yeast
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1 1/4 cups pineapple juice
  • 1/2 cup virgin coconut oil, barely melted (about 15 seconds in the microwave at 100% power)
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon ginger
  • 7-8 cups bread flour (I highly recommend using a good quality bread flour.)
  • 1 stick butter (1/2 cup), melted This will be used after forming the dough into rolls.

Instructions

  1. Proof the yeast in the 1 cup of warm water (about 110-degrees F) and a pinch of sugar. This should take about 5-10 minutes for the yeast to get all nice and bubbly.
  2. While the yeast is proofing add to the bowl of a stand mixer or other heavy duty mixer such as a Kitchen Aid or Bosch, the pineapple juice, coconut oil, honey, eggs, salt, ginger and then the proofed yeast.
  3. Add 4 cups of the flour to the above ingredients and with the paddle attachment, beat the ingredients on medium speed for 5 minutes.
  4. Remove paddle and attach bread hook. Add 2 cups flour to the mixture in the bowl and mix on medium speed until ingredients are well blended.
  5. With the mixer running, add additional flour, 1/2 cup at a time until the dough is starts to leave the sides of the bowl. Please see Note below:
  6. Allow the mixer to run at the manufacturers recommended kneading speed for 7 minutes or until the dough is smooth and elastic.
  7. Lightly oil a large bowl with cooking oil. Gather the dough into a smooth ball. Place it in the bowl and turn the dough over once so that the surface of the dough picks up a light coating of oil. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and place in a warm area to allow the dough to rise. I often barely heat my oven to about 100 degrees F or a little less, turn it off, leave the light on, and place the bowl of dough in the warm oven.
  8. Allow the dough to rise until double in bulk. Punch down and knead the dough to deflate it and redistribute all of the good yeasty stuff. Let rest, covered, for 5-10 minutes. While dough is resting, butter two 9- x 13-inch pans. Set aside.
  9. Form the dough into 40 rolls, 20 rolls per pan. Dip each roll into the melted butter and place in pans-- 4 rolls across and 5 rolls down. Cover the pans lightly with plastic wrap and return to warm oven or other warm place to rise. Allow rolls to rise for approximately 40 minutes or until nearly double in bulk. They will rise more during baking.
  10. If rolls are rising in the oven, remove them prior to heating the oven for baking. Heat the oven to 350-degrees F. Remove plastic wrap and place rolls in oven. Immediately turn the oven down to 325-degrees F. Bake rolls until golden brown, about 30 minutes. Remove rolls from oven. Allow to cool in pan for about 10 minutes. Serve.

Notes

Depending on the humidity where you live, it may not take a full 8 cups of flour. When enough flour has been added, the dough will gather to itself and clean the sides of the bowl as it is kneaded. Watch for this moment to happen sometime between cups 7 & 8 cups of flour. In very humid climates, it may take a full 8 cups of the flour (maybe even a little more...be careful). The dough will be soft and tacky, but should not be gooey, overly sticky, or heavy.

http://tsgcookin.com/2013/06/paradise-dinner-rolls/

 

You may also like:

No Knead Dinner Rolls
No-Knead Dinner Rolls
"Sunday Best" Rolls
“Sunday Best” Rolls
Quick and Easy Bread Sticks
Quick and Easy Bread Sticks

 

How to Make Whole Wheat Bread

Whole Wheat Bread

Is there anything that says hearth and home and peace more than a warm loaf of bread fresh from the oven? At least for me, there is nothing finer.

I know that an increasing number of people are finding that they are gluten intolerant, as well as an increasing number of people who are choosing to not consume gluten. I’m sorry for those who, by no choice of their own, cannot eat gluten. Food allergies can be miserable.

However, since I as yet am not intolerant of gluten, I am providing for you my favorite basic recipe for whole wheat bread. I buy whole wheat and then grind it into flour myself at home with an electric grain mill. My wheat of preference is hard white winter wheat. It has a milder flavor than red wheat and makes a beautiful loaf of bread. You do not have to grind your own wheat. Grocery stores or specialty food stores generally stock whole wheat flour. Often it is made from hard red winter wheat, but increasingly, stores are stocking flour made from hard white winter wheat as well.

Bread made from hard red winter wheat is probably the whole wheat bread with which most people are familiar. It makes a darker, hearty loaf; dense and rustic, with a distinctive flavor. On the other hand, hard white winter wheat makes a lighter loaf, with a finer texture. The flavor is more subtle than bread made with hard red winter wheat; more like “white bread”. It is my personal wheat of preference for making 100% whole wheat bread.

Making a good loaf of bread involves more than just having a good recipe. It takes a bit of practice to understand when enough flour has been added, or when the the dough has been kneaded ‘enough’, or even how to tell when the loaf is ready for the oven. It sounds intimidating to a beginner. My first loaves of bread…well…they were good learning experiences. Valuable learning experiences. Bread is often one of those things that just simply takes some practice. So, if your first loaves are not what you’d hoped, keep on working at it, you’ll figure it out. I promise. One day things will just click and you will have your ‘Ah ha!’ moment.

The whole wheat bread recipe below is designed to be used in a large capacity electric mixer, such as a Bosch, and makes four loaves of bread. A stand mixer, such as a Kitchenaid, can only handle ingredients for two loaves of bread. You know what to do, right? Yes! Cut the recipe in half. Good job.

How to Make Whole Wheat Bread, a Tutorial

The tutorial pictures for this post are fairly extensive; about 40 of them. So, don’t tell me that I don’t love you.

Whole Wheat Bread
 As you can see, this flour, made from hard white winter wheat, is fairly light in color. I use the finest setting on my wheat grinder because I prefer a very fine flour. If you don’t have a wheat grinder, not to worry. You have choices! You can buy whole wheat flour at your grocery store. Most grocery stores carry whole wheat flour ground from hard red winter wheat. However, some grocery stores are now carrying whole wheat flour made from hard white winter wheat. The white wheat makes a milder tasting whole wheat bread and a lovely, tender loaf of bread. *Visit the hard white winter wheat link in the “Learn More About It” section at the end of this tutorial.
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Whole Wheat Bread
 While you are getting everything set up, proof the yeast in 1 cup warm water with a pinch of sugar. The sugar gives the yeast a little food to help it grow faster, but only a pinch. Any more than a pinch can slow the yeast down. Getting the temperature of the water just right is crucial to proofing yeast. Water that is too hot will kill the yeast; too cool and the yeast won’t activate. The perfect water temperature is 105-110 degrees F. If you are just learning about bread making, place a thermometer under some warm running water and adjust the water as needed until it is the right temperature. Put your hand or wrist under the water, too, so that you can learn how the correct water temperature should feel.
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I use “the wrist method” for checking water temperature. If the water feels comfortably warm on the anterior portion of my wrist, then it is the right temperature for proofing the yeast. The “anterior” of your wrist is the part where you would test the temperature of milk in a baby bottle…turn your hand so that the palm is facing up–yeah, now you see the correct part of your wrist. It’s the soft, tender part where there are lots of good nerve endings for testing water temperature.
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Often bread recipes call for the dry yeast to be added with the flour, but I still like to proof my yeast first. It is a habit that I started long ago when I had poor results from the addition of dry yeast to some bread I was making. The bread was ruined because it did not rise well. Since that time, I have never been willing to commit all of my ingredients to a possible yeast failure. I realize that I am in a minority with this ‘archaic’ practice of proofing the yeast, but it’s just the way I do things.
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Whole Wheat Bread
So, while the yeast is doing the happy dance, add most of the rest of the ingredients to the mixer bowl. Start with the remaining three cups of warm water. Make sure it is warm. Cold water will slow things down too much and hot water may destroy the yeast when it is added to the liquid ingredients.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Now add the salt to the bowl.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Wo. Today the yeast was having a fiesta (better than a siesta…I hate it when the yeast takes a siesta…won’t rise, just sits there being all lazy). Sooooo, I had to add it to the bowl, pronto, or else it would have spilled out onto the counter top.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread
I like to use honey in my bread for a couple of reasons. First of all, it adds a nice flavor to the bread. Secondly, it makes a softer loaf.  As you can see from this picture, my honey has started to crystallize. No problem. This happens all the time and is easily remedied. Tip: Put the honey container in a pot of hot water and keep the water just below the boiling point by heating it over low heat on your stove. Every now and then pick up the honey container with a hot pad and swirl the honey around in the container. This helps to redistribute the liquified honey and the crystallized honey and helps the crystals to dissolve better. P.S. I have also zapped small amounts of honey in the microwave to decrystallize it, but the water bath method is much better and safer. The microwave causes hot spots in the honey making it much easier for you to burn your little self. You have been warned.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Now add the oil. A quarter cup of oil may sound like a lot of oil, but let’s do some math. 1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons. That means that each LOAF of bread has 1 tablespoon of oil in it. I cut each loaf into about 12 generous slices, so that means that each slice has 1/4 TEASPOON of oil. Still too much oil per slice? No problem–reduce the overall amount of oil to 2 tablespoons and then each slice will only have 1/8 teaspoon of oil per slice.

Whole Wheat BreadNow, sprinkle 5 cups of whole wheat flour over the wet ingredients. /

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Whole Wheat Bread
Add the vital wheat gluten. Vital wheat gluten gives a nice boost to the elasticity of the dough. An analogy would be: gluten is to bread as spinach is to Popeye. 😉 Often, flours are low in protein, which is not a good thing, because protein gives doughs and breads their structure. Kind of like our bodies–we are made of proteins, head to toe. We’d be dysfunctional without it. The same goes for bread. Gluten is a protein which gives structure and elasticity to yeast doughs, and helps to give a tender, moist crumb and chewiness to finished yeast dough products. Farther down in this post are pictures of what gluten does for the dough. *For a short, well done article on vital wheat gluten, visit the “Learn More About It” link at the end of this tutorial.
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Whole Wheat Bread
the dough enhancer…Dough enhancer is a nice, but not necessary addition to whole wheat bread. Most dough enhancers contain whey, tofu powder, citric acid, soy lecithin, sea salt, corn starch and yeast. The essentials of a dough enhancer are protein, acid, starch and sugar. To tell you the truth, if I had to choose between adding gluten and adding dough enhancer, I’d go with the gluten. However, since I have easy access to both products at most of my local grocery stores, I use both of them. They each bring something to the party, albeit gluten brings a bigger present. *Visit the “Learn More About It” link at the end of this tutorial for some great information on the function of a dough enhancer.
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Whole Wheat Bread
and the non-instant powdered milk.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread
Put the lid on the mixer (if your mixer has a lid) and turn the mixer on a medium setting. Mix for about 7-10 minutes until the ingredients are smooth and well blended.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Add another cup of flour and allow the mixer to work it into the dough. This will be cup #6.  Add cup #7 and again allow the mixer to incorporate the flour into the dough. You’ll need to increase the speed of the mixer so that it can handle the increasing heaviness of the dough.
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Whole Wheat Bread
This is what my dough looks like after 7 cups of flour.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread
When you get to cup #8, add it about 1/2 cup at a time, allowing the mixer to to work the flour into the dough. You will notice that the dough is beginning to stick to itself and is forming a central mass, but it is also still sticking to the sides of the bowl. Keep adding the flour about 1/2 cup at a time for cup #9 and cup #10 (if needed).  At some magical point, usually between cups 9 and 10, the dough will leave or clean the sides of the bowl. This is the signal that the dough has enough flour in it. STOP adding flour and allow the mixer to knead the dough for another ten minutes. Make sure to keep the lid on the bowl–I have it off in these photos so that I could take pictures of the kneading process.
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So, while the dough is kneading, heat your oven to about 150 degrees F. Newer ovens may only go as low as 170 degrees. Once the oven has heated. Turn it off, but leave the door closed.

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Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread
While the oven is heating and the dough is kneading, prepare the baking pans. The pans will need to be greased. I usually just spray them with a cooking spray, then spread the spray around evenly with a paper towel.

/Whole Wheat Bread

It is necessary for the dough to knead until it has become smooth and elastic. You will be able to see fine bubbles just barely below the surface of the dough. When you pull a portion of the dough it will be very stretchy if it has been kneaded enough. Tearing instead of stretching indicates that the dough needs to be kneaded (don’t we all) some more. See how the dough thins out in the middle when I gently pull it? This indicates that the gluten has been well worked in this dough and the proteins have formed stretchy little strands, perfectly designed to hold onto gas bubbles formed by the fermenting yeast.  The following pictures are just for fun to show the characteristics of well developed gluten in this bread dough. Sometimes before I form the bread into loaves I like to take a minute or two to play with the dough. I try to see how thin I can get it without it breaking. Today when I tried to remove the lid from the mixing bowl the dough stretched like sheer curtains between the lid and bowl. It was so cool.
Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Bread

 Isn’t it amazing??????

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Alrighty. Time to get back to work.

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Oil your hands and lightly oil your work surface. Alternatively, you can lightly flour your work surface, but I have found that lightly oiling the work surface is better for handling the dough.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Turn the dough out onto the work surface.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Gather the dough into a large ball. Turn it over and then over again so that the dough picks up a very light coating of oil.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Slice the large ball of dough into fourths of approximately the same size. I use a kitchen scale so that I can get each fourth as close to the same weight as possible. Shape into four balls.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Knead each ball of dough a few times to work out any large gas bubbles from the yeast.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Then, shape the dough into a loaf shape. This dough was very soft and pliable, easy to shape.
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Whole Wheat Bread
I prefer to make the loaf shape as long as the interior of the pan.  As the loaf rises, it gets support from all sides of the pan.
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Whole Wheat Bread
Open the oven and place the pans side by side allowing a little room between each pan. The bread pans should not be touching the edges of the oven.

/Whole Wheat BreadHeat the oven to 150-dgrees F (as low as 120-degrees F if your oven can be set that low). Some ovens cannot be set any lower than 170-degrees F, so simply turn off the oven before it reaches the 170-degree F. The point is to have a warm oven, not hot, just warm. After the oven has warmed, turn it off. Place a damp kitchen towel (preferably not terry cloth) over the loaves of bread. Close the oven door. Turn on the oven light, which will help to keep a warm environment for the bread to rise.

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Whole Wheat Bread
When the loves have doubled in bulk they will be about 1 1/2-inches above the top of the pan. They are now ready for baking. Leave the bread in the oven and turn the oven on to 350-degrees F. The bread only takes about 25-30 minutes to bake, maybe even less, so keep an eye on it. When the bread is done, the color will be golden brown.
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/Whole Wheat BreadWhole Wheat BreadTake the bread out of the oven, remove it from the oven and place each loaf on a wire rack to cool. While the bread is still hot, rub butter over the top of each loaf, if desired.

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Whole Wheat Bread
Here’s a Tip: I’ll share a little trick I learned to help keep the bread stay moist and tender while it is cooling. Using the same damp towel that was draped over the bread while it was rising, place the still damp towel over and around the loaves while they are cooling. If the towel is no longer damp, simply moisten it again, wring out the water well, and place the towel over the bread. As soon as the bread has cooled, place each loaf in a plastic bag and tie securely closed.  If you’d prefer, you can slice the loaves prior to putting them in the bags. Any loaves of bread that you will no be using within a day or two can be wrapped and frozen. Remove from freezer as needed. The frozen bread can be removed by the slices as needed or the whole loaf can removed and defrosted for use.

I hope that you enjoy your delicious homemade bread.

Whole Wheat Bread

Like warm, tender, sweet, homemade dinner rolls? Of course you do!

For a GREAT roll recipe with step-by-step instructions see my Paradise Dinner Roll recipe, which is sort of a King’s Hawaiian Roll knock-off…except BETTER!

Learn More About It:

 

100% Whole Wheat Bread

Prep Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 4 loaves

This recipe is designed to be made in high capacity mixer such as a Bosch. If using a stand mixer such as a Kitchenaid, please halve the ingredients stated in the recipe. Recipe by Terri @ that's some good cookin'

Ingredients

  • 4 cups warm water, divided
  • 3 tablespoons instant yeast (I use SAF instant yeast)
  • pinch of sugar
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 2-4 tablespoons oil (I use 4 tablespoons canola oil)
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 2/3 cup non-instant powdered milk
  • 3-4 tablespoons dough enhancer
  • 1/4 cup vital wheat gluten
  • 8-10 cups whole wheat flour

Instructions

  1. Stir yeast into 1 cup of warm water with a pinch of sugar. Allow yeast to activate. Watch carefully because the yeast can get very active very quickly.
  2. While the yeast is activating, pour the remaining 3 cups of warm water in the mixing bowl of your mixer. Add the honey, oil, and salt.
  3. Pour the activated yeast in the bowl with the other liquid ingredients.
  4. Sprinkle 5 cups of the whole wheat flour over the liquid ingredients.
  5. Sprinkle the powdered milk, dough enhancer, and vital wheat gluten over the flour.
  6. Put the dough hook in place and toggle the control of the mixer a few times to mix the ingredients.
  7. Then, turn mixer on to medium power and allow the machine to work the dough for about 7-10 minutes.
  8. After the dough looks smooth and the ingredients are well incorporated, add cup #6 of flour. Allow the mixer to incorporate the flour into the dough, then add cup #7 of flour, again allowing the mixer to incorporate the flour.
  9. The dough will start getting thicker and heavier, add #8 cup of flour 1/2 cup at a time and allow mixer to incorporate the flour. The dough will be much heavier and will require a higher setting on your mixer.
  10. Cups #9 and #10 need to be added in half cups also. However, probably somewhere between cups 9 and 10 you will notice that the dough is no longer clinging to the edges of the bowl. When you see this happen, stop adding flour to the dough. Put the lid on the bowl and allow the mixer to continue to knead the dough for another 10 minutes.
  11. After ten minutes, check the dough. It should look smooth and elastic. It will be tacky, but it should not be sticky. There's a difference. Sticky dough clings to your fingers indicating that it is too wet and may need a little bit more flour. A standard for telling if the dough has enough flour in it is to take two floured fingers and stick them down into the dough. If your fingers come out clean with no dough sticking to them, then your dough does not need any more flour.
  12. A smooth elastic dough will have tiny air bubbles just under the surface. Additionally, if you try to gently pull a small pinch of dough from the main body of dough it will stretch away from the dough. If it snaps or tears away, your dough requires more kneading.
  13. Once the dough is ready, lightly oil your hands and the work surface. Turn the dough out onto the oiled work surface and shape into a ball. Turn the ball of dough over and then over again to pick up a very light coating of oil.
  14. Cut the ball of dough into fourths. Try to make them as evenly weighted as possible. I use a kitchen scale for this task. Gather each fourth into a ball and allow to sit on counter while you prep the baking pans.
  15. Preheat the oven between 150-170 degrees F. Spray each bread pan (I use an 8-inch bread pan) with cooking spray. Take a paper towel and use it to wipe the cooking spray evenly around the interior of each pan.
  16. Knead each dough ball a few times to work out gas bubbles from the yeast. Form each dough ball into a loaf shape and transfer them to the bread pans.
  17. Turn off the oven and place the pans inside the oven for the dough to rise. Using a damp kitchen towel, place the towel over the dough while it rises. This will keep the dough from drying out.
  18. Once the dough has doubled in bulk and has risen about 1 1/2-inches above the top of the pan, turn the oven on to 350-degrees. Yes, you should leave the bread in the oven during the heating up process, this will be a part of the cooking time. The bread should be ready in about 30 minutes, maybe even sooner. Check on it after 20 minutes to see how things are progressing. The bread is ready when it turns golden brown.
  19. Remove the bread from the oven, take out of the pans and place on a wire rack. If desired, the tops of the bread can be buttered at this time. Additionally, I have a trick that I like to use to help the crusts stay soft while the bread is cooling. I take the same damp towel that I used to cover the bread when it was rising and use it to cover the bread while it is cooling. The moisture from the towel and the heat from the bread help to make a great environment for having soft bread crusts.
  20. Place the bread in plastic bags as soon as it is cool. Bread that is not going to be used within a couple of days can be frozen for future use. Some people like to slice the bread all at once so that everything is ready to go when its time to make sandwiches or toast. Also, at least in my family, there are those whose knife skills leave a lot to be desired, so a more skilled person is assigned (or chooses) to do all of the slicing! (I wonder who THAT might be?)
http://tsgcookin.com/2012/01/100-whole-wheat-bread/

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