Cardamom Ice Cream with Honey-Apricot-Orange Sauce

This Cardamom Ice Cream is silky smooth and creamy. It’s out of the ordinary, a bit exotic, and delicately flavored. Eat it all by itself or dressed up with a tangy Honey-Apricot-Orange sauce and chopped pistachios.

Cardamom Ice Cream with Honey-Apricot Sauce

As you can see, this post has a crazy long title. Sorry. I couldn’t help myself. The recipe started out as a showcase for cardamom and ended up as a three act play. Mercifully, I will spare you the details of recipe development. On the other hand, I am about to talk ad nauseum regarding cardamom and its impact in my life. Continue Reading

Strawberry Sorbet

Strawberry Sorbet

I do believe that this strawberry sorbet may just be the easiest “dessert” I have ever made. A few simple ingredients plus some freezing time and life becomes very, very good.

Strawberry sorbet screams early summer and with the added flavor of lime,Continue Reading

Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard

Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard

Utah puts out some mighty fine ice cream. Some of the best Utah ice cream comes from the Brigham Young University Creamery. Any amens out there?

How about some amens for Nielsen’s Frozen Custard? Sooooo smooth and creamy. It definitely trumps BYU ice cream. Sorry about that.

Frozen custard is not a Utah phenomenon. There are frozen custard places all over the country and pretty much each of these places has a following. Typically there are lines of people waiting to indulge themselves in frozen custard concoctions referred to as ‘concretes’. This is simply frozen custard with added ingredients of your choice. Berries, chopped nuts, or chopped candy bars are particular favorites.

How about some amens for making your own frozen custard at home? Hang on, my lovlies; the recipe is on its way. But first, let’s talk about the difference between ice cream and frozen custard.

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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard

When my inquiring mind first asked the universally important question about what made frozen custard different than ice cream, the answer I was given was a mysterious “It has eggs in it”. I thought about what I knew about making ice cream and decided that maybe I must be misguided because I had made ice cream with and without eggs, so I didn’t say anything. There must be something more than just eggs to make it a frozen custard instead of an ice cream.

Ice cream comes in two varieties, Philadelphia style and French style. Philadelphia style ice cream is made with milk, sugar, and cream as the main ingredients. French style ice cream has all of those good things plus egg yolks and in short, the ice cream is made from a custard base.

Philadelphia style, a.k.a. American style, is delicious of course. However, an ice cream made from a custard base is outstanding. It is silky, smooth, and creamy with smaller and fewer ice crystals. So now the real question becomes ‘what is the difference between a custard based ice cream and frozen custard’? The real, true, honest-to-goodness answer is “not much”, especially if we are talking a high quality French-style ice cream.

By law, the weight of frozen custard must be a minimum of 1.4% egg yolk. 1.399999999999% = ice cream. 1.4% or more = frozen custard. Additionally, there is less air in frozen custard than there is in ice cream, which makes for a denser product. Frozen custard is also smoother than ice cream because it contains less or smaller ice crystals.

  Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard

How Much Does Your Ice Cream Weigh?
I’m sorry, but I really must interject a personal observation here. Have you, by chance, ever noticed the difference in the weight of various ice creams? One day a few years ago while grocery shopping, I grabbed a carton of my favorite ice cream and started to put it in my grocery cart. I stopped dead in my tracks and balanced the carton in my hand. It didn’t feel right; as if it hadn’t been filled all the way. So, I put it back in the freezer case and picked up another carton. It, too, felt too light. Pretty soon I was comparing the ice creams’ weights brand by brand. That’s when I discovered that the ice cream industry had resorted to some pretty underhanded practices.

Just because the carton states that there are two quarts of ice cream by volume, the weight of those two quarts varies from carton to carton. Air can be added to ice cream, thereby giving it more volume. Volume and weight are not the same thing. As much as you’d like to think that the pricier ice creams have more weight, I have found that it is not so. I’d mention them by name, but I’d probably get in trouble. I will say, however, that Ben and Jerry’s is not on the cheater list. I give credit where credit is due.

With frozen custard, technique is also involved in the success of the end product. Frozen custard is richer in fat, but is served at a slightly higher temperature than ice cream, which makes the product softer. Frozen custard also has less air incorporated into it. It is slow churned. While the typical home ice cream freezer speed cannot be controlled, a beautiful end product can still be obtained.

So, ladies and gentlemen, make your own ice cream or frozen yogurt or frozen custard. Start out with something easy and work your way up from there. You can do it, I know you can. Below is a step by step tutorial. The beauty of making your own frozen custard, ice cream, etc. is that you get to choose the ingredients and the quality of the ingredients.

Whether you want to call it French style ice cream or frozen custard, it makes no difference to me. Personally, I’m going with the frozen custard theme.

Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard

Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 24 hours

Yield: Makes about 1 1/2 quarts base

Recipe by Terri @ that's some good cookin'

Ingredients

  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 3/4 cups white granulated sugar
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. In a heavy saucepan add the cream, milk, sugar, salt. Stir to combine.
  2. With a sharp knife, split the vanilla bean in half lengthwise. With the back edge of the knife, scrape the inside of each half to release the vanilla bean seeds (sometimes referred to as vanilla bean caviar). Add the vanilla bean seeds and the vanilla bean pod halves to the cream mixture.
  3. Place pot over medium low or medium heat, stirring just until steam starts to rise. Do not boil.
  4. Remove pot from heat and proceed with step #4.
  5. In a medium size bowl, whisk together the egg yolks. Temper the egg yolks by slowly pouring about 1 cup of the hot cream mixture into the egg yolks while whisking quickly and constantly. Whisking is important because the hot liquid can cook the egg yolks, which would ruin the custard. Although this may sound like an intimidating step, it will work out very well if you remember to slowly add the hot liquid to the egg yolks while whisking quickly.
  6. Pour the tempered egg yolk/cream mixture slowly back into the saucepan while again whisking quickly.
  7. Over medium heat to medium low heat, continue to stir the mixture until it is thickened and coats the back of a metal spoon. Slide your finger across the back of the coated spoon. If a definitive line remains, then the custard is done. If not, continue to cook and stir the mixture, testing periodically with the spoon until the custard has developed.
  8. Now this is an optional step, but it may be a good idea if you have noticed any small lumps in your custard base. Pour the custard through a fine mesh strainer into a separate bowl to separate out any of the little lumpy stuff.
  9. Stir in the vanilla extract.
  10. Place the pot or bowl with the custard into an ice bath and stir until the mixture has cooled. (I set the pot in a large bowl about a quarter filled with ice and a little water. Use whatever you have available, even the kitchen sink with some ice in it will do the trick.) REMOVE the vanilla bean pods if you have not already done so.
  11. After the custard has cooled. Cover and put in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight until completely chilled. It is best to work with a well chilled product. If you choose to process the custard after the ice bath, the only problem, which will not really be so much of a problem, is that the end product will not be as smooth. To be frank, sometimes I skip that 'thoroughly chilled' step. Tell no one. However, I must confess that the product turns out better if it is chilled before churning.
  12. Process according to manufacturer's instructions in an ice cream freezer. Remove dasher from the custard. The custard will be soft set at this point, similar to a thick milk shake. Sometimes, it's great to serve it up as is. However, if you prefer a firmer product, put the custard in a covered container and place in freezer for several hours or over night until firm (this is called ripening).

Notes

The total time listed in this recipe includes chilling and freezing times.

http://tsgcookin.com/2012/08/vanilla-bean-frozen-custard/

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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 The cream, milk, and sugar. I didn’t think to take a picture of “the process”.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 I did, however, remember to take a picture of pouring in the salt.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Stir these guys together.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 This is a vanilla bean pod. Take a moment to inhale it’s wonderful aroma. Try not to get lost in the experience.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 With a sharp knife, split the vanilla bean in half lengthwise.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Scrape the inside of the vanilla bean to release the seeds or caviar. Please use the back of your knife. Without thinking I used the sharp blade side of my knife. The back of the blade works better.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 The most wondrous stuff on earth.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Add the vanilla bean seeds to your pot.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 I like to cut the vanilla bean into fourths simply because it is easier to stir in the pot.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Add those bean pods to the pot, too.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
Over medium low or medium heat, cook and stir the mixture just until steam starts to rise. You don’t have to stir quickly, just stir enough to keep things from sticking to the bottom or sides of the pot. Remove pot from hot burner and set aside.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 In a medium sized bowl, whisk egg yolks together.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 SLOWLY pour about a cup of the hot cream mixture into the egg yolks while QUICKLY whisking. This is called tempering the eggs. By slowly pouring  the hot cream mixture into the egg mixture and quickly whisking at the same time, the eggs will not cook. You definitely do not want cooked egg yolks in your custard.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 See this? Smooth as a baby’s behind. I whisked so briskly that I got a head of foam going. No problem with the foam.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Now pour the tempered eggs back into the pot with the rest of the cream mixture. I ought to have been whisking during this part, but I lost my photo partner for this part of the shoot. The Olympics take ultimate priority over photographing tempered egg yolks being added back to a hot cream pot. To tell you the truth, I poured just this little bit back into the pot, snapped a pic while I was pouring, then put down the camera and stirred like crazy while I finished adding the tempered egg yolks to the pot.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Over medium low or medium heat, cook and stir the soon-to-be-custard mixture together.  Cook and stir until…..
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 …the mixture thickens and coats the back of a metal spoon. Draw a line across the back of the spoon through the custard coating. If a definitive mark is left, then the custard is ready. If not, then cook and stir some more until the custard passes the test. Turn off the heat and remove pot from hot burner.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Now add the vanilla extract.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 And of course stir it into the other ingredients.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Place the pot of custard into an ice bath. I used a large metal bowl with ice and a little bit of water in it. If you don’t have a large bowl, then use your kitchen sink.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Stir the custard periodically to help cool it.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Oh…don’t forget to take out the vanilla bean pods.
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This is the part of the plan where you put the cooled custard into a container and chill it in the fridge for several hours or over night. If you can wait that long. Sometimes I can wait and sometimes I cannot.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
 Process the well chilled custard in your ice cream maker until it reaches a soft set stage, somewhere between 20-25 minutes.
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard

At this point there are more choices to make: 1) eat it now; 2) put it in a container and allow it freeze for several hours in the freezer. I do both, but at my house I’m the only one who gets to do this because I’m the cook.

Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
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Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
Photo shoot aftermath.

This recipe has been shared at the following linky parties:

Strawberry-Banana Cake Batter Ice Cream

Strawberry Cake Batter Ice Cream

So what if I don’t have a complete kitchen right now? I can still make food that doesn’t require actual cooking. Plus, we have electricity and running water in other places around the house. I have to tell you, though, of all the things I am missing the most right now, it’s the kitchen sink. Good thing I know how to camp and clean dishes in unusual places.  It has been a while since I’ve actually camped, so this is a good refresher course in camp sanitation. Note to self: Build recipe collection of Dutch oven recipes. Minimal clean-up. Happy self.

I had some strawberries and a lone banana that had gone unnoticed by the grandmunchkins and when I was cleaning out the cupboards I had found a partially used box of cake mix. I knew that I had had some left-over cake mix somewhere, but where it had disappeared was a mystery. My previous ‘pantry’ was like a black hole where many things got lost and other things would suddenly come flying out at me when I opened the door.

It seemed a natural progression of thoughts to put these ingredients together in an ice cream. I almost never tire of strawberries and bananas. The ice cream base is incredibly easy to put together, just mix everything in the blender. I threw this ice cream together one evening, processed it in my little ice cream maker, let it ripen in the freezer overnight, and then had it for breakfast the next morning. What? Doesn’t everyone eat ice cream for breakfast? Which reminds me of a story….

Strawberry Cake Batter Ice Cream

My husband used to travel a lot for work when our children were young. I would always go into a little bit of a cooking funk whenever John left town. Late one afternoon I decided to take the kids for ice cream at a local ice cream parlor. This particular place was known for serving large quantities. I told the kids that they could order anything on the menu. You should have seen the look on their faces; they were ecstatic! They dug into their ice cream creations and started gobbling with free abandon. Finally one of the kids stopped eating and, with a puzzled look and slight hesitation in his voice, asked, “Mom? Um, what are we having for dinner?”

“You’re eating it,” I answered with a grin.

The kids looked at each other with wide eyes and then started giggling uncontrollably. “We’re having ice cream for dinner!!!!!”

It’s not often that a mom gets to see ALL of the kids happy about ‘what’s for dinner’. I look back on that day as one of the shining moments of personal excellence in my life. For an hour I was a queen among mothers; she who reigned as the planet’s rockingest mom in the eyes of her children. One whole hour! And then they all got sick to their stomachs. Literally. Oh well, at least I had my moment.

Something fun. When I took a jar of strawberry freezer jam out of the freezer and opened it, there were these very cool large ice crystals on the lid. I have always been mesmerized by crystal formations, particularly ice crystals.

Strawberry Cake Batter Ice Cream
Strawberry Cake Batter Ice Cream
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Strawberry-Banana-Cake Batter Ice Cream

Yield: Makes approximately 4 1/2 cups of ice cream base.

Recipe by Terri @ that's some good cookin'

Ingredients

  • 1/2 pound (8 ounces) strawberries, quartered
  • 1 ripe banana, peeled and cut into thick slices
  • 1 cup white granulated sugar
  • 1 cup half and half
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup dry yellow, white, or strawberry cake mix (unprepared)
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • strawberry topping (optional--I used some strawberry freezer jam)

Instructions

  1. Put the strawberries, banana, sugar, and half and half into a blender and puree.
  2. Add the cake mix and vanilla. Process for a few seconds until all ingredients are incorporated.
  3. Add the heavy cream and pulse several times until cream has been well incorporated.
  4. Pour ice cream base into an appropriate container and refrigerate to chill.
  5. Once the ice cream base has chilled, pour it into the bucket of your ice cream maker and process according to manufacturer's instructions.
  6. After processing, put the ice cream into a bowl or other container, seal, and place in the freezer for several hours to allow the ice cream to get firm (ripen).
  7. For serving, top with strawberry topping or fresh fruit, if desired.
http://tsgcookin.com/2012/06/strawberry-banana-cake-batter-ice-cream/

 

Pomegranate-Orange Ice Cream Float

Pomegranate Orange Ice Cream FloatAhhhhhhhhhhhh…….this is so good! And I have drunk so much pomegranate and orange juice this afternoon that my jeans are bursting at the seams and my belly needs a bra. Is it bad to drink so much juice? The ice cream is the least of my worries because I’ve only had a little bit of it. The juices, on the other hand, have been inhaled in significantly larger quantities.

At first I was just going for a nice pomegranate juice and fruit blend for a fun Holiday drink (non-alcoholic, dearies) and then I kept changing/adding/subtracting until low and behold I plopped a scoop of ice cream in the whole kit and kaboodle and screamed at the sheer wonder of it all. Actually, I smacked my forehead with my hand and mumbled something to the effect of, “Geez, dumbhead. Why didn’t you think of this sooner?”Continue Reading