Sauteed Summer Squash

Sauteed Summer Squash recipe
Becca asked me for some zucchini recipes and luckily I have a few.  However, we are a multi-squash variety type of family so we tend to mix and match with whatever is available at the time.  We have three types of summer squash growing in the garden this year–3 varieties of yellow squash, 2 varieties of zucchini, , and a Middle Eastern variety called magda.
Sauteed Summer Squash recipe

 

I did a some research on the internet to see if I could find some interesting recipes starring zucchini or any other summer sqaush.  There are some really heinous sounding ones that made me slightly queasy just reading the titles.

Zucchini often gets used as a filler and is thrown into a recipe in disguise–“finely shred the zucchini and hide it in a lime cheesecake. Your family will think that the green flecks are lime zest and will never know that they are actually eating something healthy!” Gag.

The main thing about zucchini and other summer squash is that people often misjudge how large the squash should be before they are picked. Think small. The flesh is most flavorful and tender when the squash is on the smaller size. Over-grown zucchini is inevitable; you will miss some in the picking process and won’t find them until one day when you look out of the kitchen window and notice that something looks wildly out of kilter in the garden. You’ll walk outside to investigate and low and behold there will sit a gargantuan zucchini for which you will need a chain saw to separate it from its mother plant. There are some choices for over-grown zucchini:

  1. toss it in the compost pile
  2. feed it to your neighbor’s chickens–just cut in half lengthwise, toss it over the fence, and the chickens will pick out the soft parts
  3. make 25 batches of zucchini bread (All joking aside, I really like zucchini bread!)

The following recipe is one that my family often enjoys during our summer squash bounty. It is simple to make, requiring only a few  ingredients.  You will see that this recipe calls for bacon.  I buy a package of bacon ends and pieces, portion them out into quart-sized freezer bags and freeze for later use.

Sauteed Summer Squash

  • 4-6 zucchini or other summer squash, cut into 1/2-inch thick rounds
  • 1 onion, sliced chunky
  • 4 slices bacon, chopped
  • Johnny’s seasoning salt, to taste (I am a Johnny’s fan, but use whatever seasoning salt you have available.)

In a large frying pan, fry bacon until crisp. Remove bacon, leaving about 2 tablespoons of drippings in the pan. Set the bacon aside on paper towels to drain.

Toss the onions into the frying pan with the reserved bacon drippings and stir-fry for a couple of minutes.

Add the squash and sprinkle with Johnny’s seasoning salt. Stir fry the vegetables for 4-5 minutes and then add the bacon pieces. Continue to stir fry until the vegetables are a little past crisp-tender, but not to the mushy stage. Squash may be hardy in the garden, but it is delicate in the kitchen and is easily over-cooked.  Serve as a side with any of your favorite comfort meals.

Sauteed Summer Squash recipe
Chop the bacon ends and pieces; slice the onions thick or chunky.
Sauteed Summer Squash recipe
Fry the bacon until crisp and the fat has rendered. Reserve about 2 tablespoons of the fat for sauteing the vegetables.
Sauteed Summer Squash recipe
Add the onions to the that wonderful bacon fat and stir fry them for about 2 minutes.
Sauteed Summer Squash recipe
Put the squash in the pan with the onions and stir-fry for 4-5 minutes.
Sauteed Summer Squash recipe
Sprinkle everything with Johnny’s or the seasoning salt of your choice…
Sauteed Summer Squash recipe
…and add the bacon. Toss together. Put the lid on the pan and let the squash steam, stirring occasionally. I like to cook my squash slightly past the crisp-tender stage, but not to the mushy stage. Let’s call it a gentle resistance stage. Squash can easily over-cook, so don’t neglect it while you’re cooking.
Sauteed Summer Squash recipe
This tastes so comforting and brings back good memories.

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